Federal Crime Lawyers in Orlando, Florida

Protect Your Future with Musca Law

Federal crimes can really hurt your future. They can be classified as misdemeanors, but some are also felonies. However, since the government is involved, they are usually pretty serious. 

It can be a very scary time to face a federal crime because you may not know what to expect and fear the worst. What you really need is a lawyer that can fight for you. All of our attorneys at Orlando’s Musca Law Office will fight hard for your rights to protect your future. We have over 150 years of collective experience. We will obtain the best defense for your case in order to find the best possible outcome for you. Please call us today at (888) 484-5057.

Federal Crimes Defined

Federal crimes are ones that violate federal law. These cases will be prosecuted in federal court. Sometimes federal crimes will be prosecuted in a stricter manner than if they were prosecuted at the local or state level. 

Federal Crime Examples

The following are all examples of federal crimes.

  • Terrorism
  • Counterintelligence Crimes
  • Mail Fraud
  • Cybercrime
  • Corruption of the Public
  • Violation of Civil Rights
  • Computer Crimes
  • Illegal Wiretapping
  • Damaging and Destroying Public Mailboxes
  • Organized Criminal Activity
  • Civil Action to Restrain Harassment of a Victim or Witness
  • Coercion
  • Commodities Price Fixing
  • Blackmail
  • Bombing Matters
  • Bond Default
  • Breaking and/or Entering Carrier Facilities
  • Violent Crimes
  • Theft of Art, Jewelry, or other items of value
  • Immigration Crime
  • Kidnapping
  • Bank Robbery
  • Child Pornography
  • Credit Card fraud
  • Demands Against the U.S.
  • Destruction of Aircraft and Motor Vehicles Used in Foreign Commerce
  • Destruction of an Energy Facility
  • Destruction of Property to Prevent Seizure
  • Destruction of Records in Federal Investigations and Bankruptcy
  • Destruction of Corporate Audit Records
  • Destruction of Veterans’ Memorials
  • The Detention of Armed Vessels
  • Carjacking
  • Airplane Hijacking
  • Art Theft from a museum
  • Threats against members of the government
  • White-Collar Crimes

Federal Fraud Crimes

There are many different types of federal crimes that involve fraud. These include:

  • Federal Tax fraud
  • Healthcare fraud
  • Welfare fraud
  • Mortgage fraud
  • Bank fraud
  • Social Security fraud
  • Wire fraud
  • Mail fraud

White Collar Federal Crimes

The following are different types of white collar crimes that can be prosecuted at the federal level:

  • Bribery
  • Money laundering
  • Embezzlement
  • Security violations
  • Passing bad checks
  • ID theft
  • Internet fraud
  • Credit Card theft
  • Forgery
  • Conspiracy
  • Racketeering
  • Falsifying business records

Federal Drug Crimes

The following are federal drug crimes under the Controlled Substance Act:

  • Drug trafficking
  • Manufacturing of drugs
  • Conspiracy
  • Simple possession
  • Protected location offenses
  • Continuing criminal enterprise crimes

Agencies That Handle Federal Crime Violations in Orlando

If a crime is committed at the federal level, one of the following agencies will intervene to investigate the crime. If needed, more than one agency can investigate. 

  • Internal Revenue Services
  • U.S. Marshals Service
  • U.S. Postal Inspection Service
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives
  • Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Drug Enforcement Administration
  • U.S. Secret Service
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Health and Human Services
  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Federal Crimes vs. State Crimes

There are many differences in federal and state crimes. 

Federal crimes are prosecuted by assistant U.S. attorneys while state crimes are prosecuted by the state attorney or city attorney. 

Federal judges are appointed by the president and will be a federal judge for life. State judges can be appointed by the governor, but will need to sit in for re-election. 

Federal crime cases typically take longer than state crime cases. 

Federal crime cases are being investigated by agencies like the FBI, the U.S. Secret Service, and Heath and Human Services. State crimes are being investigated by police officers, state agents, and county sheriffs departments. 

Federal penalties are typically longer than state penalties. 

Federal Government Jurisdiction

The Federal Government has jurisdiction in the following situations:

Federal Investigation Steps

If you are being investigated by a federal agency, there are several things that can happen. You may find that a federal agent is at your doorstep wanting to question you about various things. Or you could possibly receive a target letter. Federal agents could also obtain a search warrant to search your property. 

These agents may also interview family, friends, neighbors, or co-workers. 

If a federal agent shows up at your door, they are seeking information that can be used against you in court. You do have the right to remain silent. At this time, it is in your best interest to obtain legal counsel. Anything that you say or do can be held against you in court.

Statute of Limitations for Federal Crimes

Many crimes have limitations. This is defined as the amount of time in which a crime can be prosecuted. Depending on the crime will depend on the statute of limitations. 

Some crimes will not have a statute of limitations. This means that they can be prosecuted even after several years have passed. Crimes that do not have a statute of limitations include:

Many federal crimes will need to be prosecuted within five years from the time that they occurred. However, there are some exceptions to this. These include:

Classes of Offenses Under the United States Federal Law

Felonies

There are five classes of felonies in the United States Federal Government. Class A is the most serious, while class E is the least serious. Each has its own maximum fine and probation term, along with a maximum supervised release term, a maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation, and a special assessment. 

A class A felony will have a maximum sentence of life in prison and possibly the death penalty. The maximum fine will be $250,000 with a probation term of one to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be 5 years, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be five years, and the special assessment will be $100.

A class B felony will have a maximum sentence of 25 years or more in prison. The maximum fine will be $250,000 with a probation term of one to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be five years, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be three years, and the special assessment will be $100.

A class C felony will have a maximum sentence of less than 25 years but more than 10 years. The maximum fine will be $250,000 with a probation term of one to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be three years, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be two years, and the special assessment will be $100.

A class D felony will have a maximum sentence of less than ten years but more than five years. The maximum fine will be $250,000 with a probation term of one to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be three years, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be two years, and the special assessment will be $100.

A class E felony will have a maximum sentence of less than five years but more than one year. The maximum fine will be $250,000 with a probation term of one to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be one year, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be one year, and the special assessment will be $100.

Aggravating factors, or elements that can cause a judge to increase the maximum sentence above what is suggested include:

Other factors that could be used to decrease the suggested sentence include:

Misdemeanors

There are three classes of misdemeanors in the United States Federal Government. Each has its own maximum fine and probation term, along with a maximum supervised release term, a maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation, and a special assessment. 

A class A misdemeanor will have a maximum sentence of less than one year but more than six months. The maximum fine will be $100,000 with a probation term of zero to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be one year, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be one year , and special assessment will be $25.

.A class B misdemeanor will have a maximum sentence of less than six months but more than 30 days. The maximum fine will be $5,000 with a probation term of zero to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be one year, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be one year, and the special assessment will be $10.

A class C misdemeanor will have a maximum sentence of less than 30 days but more than five days. The maximum fine will be $5,000 with a probation term of one to five years. The maximum supervised release term will be one year, the maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation will be one year, and the special assessment will be $5.

Infractions

The infraction does not include any classes. There is a maximum time of five days in prison when an infraction occurs. The probation terms last from one to five years. There is no maximum supervised release term or maximum prison term upon supervised release revocation. There is also no special assessment. 

Offense Levels for Federal Crimes

There are federal sentencing guidelines for federal judges to use during sentencing for those who have been committed of a federal crime. These were designed to give judges a fair and consistent sentence range. The guidelines are not mandatory. However, a judge that refrains from using them must provide a reason as to why he or she came up with the sentence, even if it is a lighter sentence. 

According to the guidelines, there are 43 offensive levels. 

Full List of Federal Crimes and Relatable Punishments

The Code of the United States House of Representatives, was set by the United States government. Here you will find a full listing of all federal crimes, along with their punishments. 

Musca Law Orlando - Your Federal Crimes Attorney

If you have been charged with a federal crime, you will need an attorney to assist you in this matter. All of our Musca Law Attorneys want the best for your future and will fight for you. We offer a free initial consultation to see if we are the right fit for the case. We believe we will be a great fit for your case. 

Our office accepts phone calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We know that life happens outside of normal 9:00 am to 5:00 pm business hours, so we are willing to meet you on weekends and after hours to discuss your case.

Musca Law attorneys will work together on your case to develop the strongest defense possible. We will gather as much information as we need, along with witnesses if applicable. 

We urge you to call your Orlando Musca Law office to set up your appointment. We look forward to meeting you and protecting your future. 

  • If a crime takes place on any federal land or involves federal officers, it will be considered a federal crime. Examples of this would include an assault against a U.S. Secret Service agent, a murder on a military base, or theft on an Indian reservation.
  • Any crime that happens when criminal conduct crosses state lines. An example of this would be a person doing money laundering in many states. 
  • Any immigration or customs violations, such as importing child pornography. 
  • It's a crime where the defendant crosses state lines, such as kidnapping a child in Wisconsin and then traveling to Iowa with the child. 
    • Those crimes that have been punished by the death penalty.
    • Various federal crimes of terrorism.
    • Different federal sex crimes.
    • Crimes of arson
    • Crimes against Financial Institutes
    • Immigration offenses
    • Art theft
    • If the defendant used a weapon during the crime.
    • If there was a serious physical injury to the victim.
    • If there was a death of one or more individuals. 
    • Abduction.
    • If the defendant was coerced. 
    • The defendant has assisted authorities in bringing additional perpetrators to justice. 
    • The victim provoked the defendant significantly. 
Get your case started by calling us at (888) 484-5057 today!